The Benefits of Running in the Rain

It’s been cold and rainy here in Perth the last several weeks. Thousands of people have given up their exercise routines for the warm and comfort found in their own homes.

I wouldn’t blame you if you’re one of them. It’s a pretty natural reaction to stay in your comfort zone and conserve energy. Most of these people, however, know that they should be sticking to a regular exercise regime.

On the other hand, there are plenty of people who are heading to the gym as normal, working out inside their houses, or even exercising in the cold and in the rain. To these people, not exercising is more uncomfortable than going out and just doing it.

The best part? If you’re part of the first group, it’s possible to change to the second group. The benefits of being able to exercise every week of the year are obvious. Being able to run in the rain (or exercise in abnormal conditions) reaffirms a decision to reach or maintain a certain level of fitness. It tells your mind and your body that you are going to do this, even if either one decides to have a whine.

How can you do this? While I don’t have the exact answers, I believe that part of the equation is forming new habits. These are new behaviours that you have to decide to do regardless of what else is going on in your life (excluding emergencies, of course). It’s not easy, but the return on investment is huge.

Your task is to find a way to make it work for you in your life. What works for me may not necessarily work for you (although I would suggest using a hooded jumper if you’re going to run in the rain).

Or are you okay with letting your health slip, just because it’s a bit cold outside? What will that look like in five years’ time? Ten years? Will you get to meet your grandchildren?

Comments

    Leave a Reply

    XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>